Saturday, November 27, 2010

24/7 helpline for Indian workers is a hit, already Sajila Saseendran

24/7 helpline for Indian workers is a hit, already Sajila Saseendran


24/7 helpline for Indian workers is a hit, already Sajila Saseendran






26 November 2010 Mir Liyaqat Ali’s 15-year-old son, Ibrahim, was hit by a speeding car on November 7 and suffered a femur fracture. His right thighbone broke into two and he underwent two surgeries, the second one on Wednesday.

The driver of the car, which hit Ibrahim, is out on bail and Ali has been in the dark about the legal procedures to make a claim for the damages. When he read about the helpline of Indian Workers’ Resource Centre launched by the visiting Indian President Pratibha Devisingh Patil, Ali rang up the toll-free number 800 INDIA (80046342). “I was given a reference number and they said that they will get back to me at the earliest after consulting a legal expert. They were very nice to me,” he told Khaleej Times.


Devoted toll-free number for Indian expats

Indian expatriates needing help anytime now have a lifeline. All they need to do is call the toll-free number 800 India.


Several Indian expatriates like Ali have sought the help from the Resource Centre since its launch on Tuesday evening. Minutes after the helpline number was announced, a person who was identified as J. Jayakrishnan rang up the centre to ask for procedures to follow in the case of a damaged passport.

It was the beginning of a flurry of calls to IWRC, an initiative of the Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs (MOIA) to offer a 24/7 helpline and legal, financial and psychological counselling services to Indian expatriates, especially the unskilled and semi-skilled workers.

Amjad Auzam of VFS Global, which is running the Centre, said over 400 calls were received by Thursday evening. “Based on the statistics we collect over these initial days, we will consider increasing the number of agents attending the calls after consulting the Embassy and the Consulate.”

He said that the walk-in counter which functions from 3pm to 7pm daily at the centre in Bank Street in Dubai also received a handful of workers with miscellaneous petitions on the first two days.

Dr K. Elangovan, counsellor (Community Affairs) at the Indian Embassy in Abu Dhabi, said the initial response to the centre was “fantastic.”

“We hope the members of the community will also make use of the information provided on the centre’s website — www.iwrc-uae.com. The FAQ section on the site answers about 170 questions. These are pertaining to complaints that we regularly receive from people. We have formulated them into points and legally vetted them after consulting lawyers,” said Dr Elangovan, who is also in charge of monitoring the operations of IWRC for the Embassy.

Step-wise information related to passport and visa services, death formalities, emergency certificates, workers and housemaids have been given in the FAQ section.

According to Dr A Didar Singh, secretary in the MOIA, lack of awareness about the legal procedures and services is one of the biggest problems being faced by Indian workers. Secondly, they have individual problems pertaining to employment, salary disbursement, living conditions, financial issues and family problems.

These issues will be discussed during awareness classes to be conducted by the IWRC. “The campaign will begin from December 15. Our plan is to conduct at least two sessions on every Friday and hold about 10 sessions in different emirates in a month. From January, VFS Global will also take charge of the Shelter Home for maids and domestic workers run by the Indian Consulate in Dubai,” said Dr Elangovan.

The president also launched a website of the centre — www.iwrc-uae.com.

sajila@khaleejtimes.com

To read this in original, please visit Khaleej Times online.

Short Take - GULF TODAY - Dt. 27.11.2010 - Creative Kids

Short Take - GULF TODAY - Dt. 27.11.2010 - Creative Kids


Creative kids

This was a busy week in which the UAE witnessed the visit of Indian President Prathibha Devising Patil.

A few days prior to her visit, Nov.14 to celebrate Children’s Day, a painting competition was organised by the Cultural Wing of the India Embassy. The event was held at Abu Dhabi Indian School. About 1,400 children from various schools in the UAE participated in this well organised event.

The senior participants were to choose any of the four themes - children of the world, save the girl child, the independence movement and the joys of childhood. Grades 1 to 4 pupils were given the themes of “Chacha Nehru” and “my school.” What made interesting insight into this event was the way the organisers made sure to make the children feel the presence of Jawaharlal Nehru. Those children who participated in the event thoroughly enjoyed it as they were well taken care of during the event.

Interests in non-performing arts like painting, drawing and writing give opportunity for children to express their mind and thoughts in simpler ways. Any given opportunity to conduct and showcase such talents should never be missed.

According to the organisers, the painting competition would be conducted every year.

One interesting factor came out of this competition was the fact that out of the 12 winners, 11 were girls and there was only one boy amongst the winners. Sunrise English Private School Abu Dhabi (4 prizes) came out with maximum winners followed by Abu Dhabi Indian School (3 prizes) and Delhi Private School Dubai (2 prizes). Delhi Private School Sharjah, St Joseph School Abu Dhabi and Gulf Asian School Sharjah bagged one price each.

An icing on the cake for the winners was that the Indian president distributed the prizes during her visit to Abu Dhabi Indian School.

Ramesh Menon

To read it in original, please visit GULF TODAY online.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

A historic visit could lead to improvements - My Letters - THE NATIONAL - Dt. 24.11.2010

My Letters - THE NATIONAL - Dt. 24.11.2010 - A historic visit could lead to improvements



A historic visit could lead to improvements
Last Updated: Nov 24, 2010


Regarding US and India a defining partnership this century (November 8): I was thinking of the various landmark improvements that could come along with this visit after India was branded "a nation that has arrived" by the US president Barack Obama.

Yes, after a period of recession, India is coming out as a nation of importance. The UAE is also confidently emerging with economic and administrative capabilities as a regional leader of significance.

There are a few concrete steps India could take to improve its services. Air India could become more efficient and upgrade its quality in order to compete with other airlines. Exit surveys of passengers could be taken to update traveller information and improve the quality of service.

Universities such as the Indian Institutes of Technology and the All India Institute of Medical Sciences could also extend its branches to the UAE. Indian residents and international students could thus compete with each other without having to leave the Emirates. There could also be schools and universities in India teaching Arabic, Islamic studies and Islamic arts.

Such basics requirements - economically viable and punctual transportation, increased educational facilities, and a safe and secure working environment - are but some improvements that would capture the spirit of Mr Obama's remarks.

I am thankful that I work in the UAE, where all my interests are well protected. I look forward to the add-ons that could further materialise from this historic visit.

Ramesh Menon, Abu Dhabi

To read it in original, please visit THE NATIONAL online.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Exploring Abu Dhabi through Clicks and Writes - Clouds and changing weather

Exploring Abu Dhabi through Clicks and Writes - Clouds and changing weather

 


Abu Dhabi weather is getting cooler and it is an enjoyable period we all get in terms of climate. The beauty does not end there as there are several activities happening with the 39th UAE National Day approaching. You may get a day or two of rain too very soon. Have a great time.

Doing our bit - My Letters - Khaleej Times Dt. 23.11.2010

My Letters - Khaleej Times Dt. 23.11.2010 - Doing our bit
23 November 2010




This is in reference to a recent letter requesting the travellers to keep the visa page open while they queue for immigration at the airports. Travellers should be familiar with their passport entries like any addition of information, special endorsements and of course the page number on which visa is stamped for entry.

Immigration officers have a standard procedure of scanning through all the relevant details starting from the main page and may have queries in case any additional updates or amendments have been made in the passport.

Therefore, it is not necessary to keep the visa page open before meeting the officer.

He/she should be aware of the pages and entries in his/her and the family’s passport. This in turn will also help the officer as well as other passenger gain a speedier clearance.

Ramesh Menon, Abu Dhabi

To read it in original, please visit Khaleej Times online.

Saturday, November 20, 2010

Short Take - GULF TODAY - Dt. 20.11.2010 - Helping Hand

Short Take - GULF TODAY - Dt. 20.11.2010 - Helping Hand



Helping hand


Last week was significant for sports lovers, especially in the UAE. The first-ever test cricket match played in UAE ended in a draw. More significantly, the 2nd edition of the F1 championship produced the youngest winner in a thrilling final.

These sports events were keenly watched by many and what made me as an interesting spectator of the thrilling finish at Yas Marina was the gesture by Sebastian Vettel, after halting his car.

Accepting the applause from the spectators he came out and kissed his car, laying his head on the tyres and the machine. It showed in one way or another man’s acceptance to the kindness of blessings from a super natural being to succeed in life, and keep all options and equipment accurate and running perfectly till any race we run is completed.

This also brings out another interesting event happened in my life last week. An organisation was changing their computer system and were left with 27 CPUs in good condition.

As the units were new and in good condition, they wanted to sell it for a nominal cost and suddenly one of their staff knew about me and my social connections and called me. I was happy to accept their request and spread the word around whether any takers for the same for socially benefiting cause.

Manzil - an organisation based in Sharjah, which gives care and learning environment to those with special needs and encourages them to explore their potential to the fullest, came forward to accept them.

With whole-hearted support from the organisation GHD, Abu Dhabi and their senior management and those two staff members, we were able to send the PCs to Manzil before the Eid holidays.

I could not control my tears of joy when I received a thank you note and special Eid greetings from those children and staff from Manzil as they accepted this unexpected gift on Thursday.

Job only half done as I look around for more volunteers to help them with the basics of computing.

Ramesh Menon

To read it in original, please visit GULF TODAY online.

To know more about Manzil, please visit http://www.manzil.ae/

If interested to become a volunteer, please write to them directly at volunteer@manzil.ae

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Urakam Ammathiruvadi Temple - Photos of Samarppanam of 18 Bali stones covered with brass

Urakam Ammathiruvadi Temple - Photos of Samarppanam of 18 Bali stones covered with brass

Photos of SAMARPANAM OF 18 BALI STONES with BRASS covered held on 17th November 2010 (Vrishikam 1),







Saturday, November 13, 2010

Short Take - Dt. 13.11.2010 - Point to ponder

Short Take - Dt. 13.11.2010 - Point to ponder



Point to ponder

The season has changed. Winter is almost here. Many people may take the Eid break. One thing I noticed during the last couple of weeks here. I find cars parked for days and covered with full of dust.

Although, it is becoming cool outside, for somewhere, someone, the heat is on. Is it turning out to be real that there is an effect of financial crunch happening around?

The banking sector is also in greater caution and this is another major area for many of us who has an attitude to be there when in need. It is therefore important to be in touch with your regular friends/loved ones/contacts.

Make sure you get to create a communication and feel their pulse. I am sure you will definitely be able to get the feelings across, even if it is a silence or pause in the communication. But to be there at the time in need is the most important gift you can give to a friend or a well wisher of yours.

The reason for writing this here is an interview of Malayalam movie actor Dileep shown on TV sometime ago about one of his movie where he did a stunt scene by jumping into the sea.

In it he explained what was his feeling before jumping and once in motion down. No control, and life and death was seconds away. Luckily for him there were people to rescue, who were on standby. But a repeat shot had to be taken and he continued, there were no one around and it was really touch and go. Two years ago I had to go through the motions of the death of two friends who committed suicide. If someone was there to hold them/restrain them back from that crucial decision, life would have been an altogether different thing for their children.

We all boast of so many friends and well wishers on several media and social forums. How many of them will be there to care for you when in real need? A point to ponder?

So, let the party continue, enjoy life as it happens, but keep an eye and ear open for that precious silence somewhere around. You never know, when a chance hello or a short email from you will make you realise the reason for that precious silence and may give you an opportunity to be the most important person for someone whom you care.

Ramesh Menon
To read it in original, please visit GULF TODAY online.

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Daily Management Thoughts - All improvement takes place project by project and in no other way

Daily Management Thoughts - All improvement takes place project by project and in no other way

Eid Mubarak

Manzil - a destination, a dream, a hope - gets 27 pcs from GHD

Manzil - a destination, a dream, a hope - gets 27 pcs from GHD

Useful HSE Information - Danger of keeping Laptop in Bed

Useful HSE Information - Danger of keeping Laptop in Bed

A couple in Mequon lost their 25 year old son Arun Gopal in a freak fire accident at home June 4th. This is exactly what happened. Arun had graduated with MBA from University of Wisconsin-Madison just two weeks earlier and had came home from the campus for a day
.
He had lunch with his dad at home and decided to go back to to clean up his room at the campus. However, his dad told him to wait and see his mother before returning to the campus as she was due back from work in a couple of hours. He decided to snooze while waiting for his mom while his dad went out.

Neighbors called 911 when they saw black smoke coming out of the house. The 25 year old Arun died in the three year old house. It took several days of investigation to find out the cause of the fire. It was determined that the fire was caused by lap top in the bed.

When the lap top is on the bed, the area below it is blocked and the cooling fan does not get air to cool it   and that is what caused the fire. Arun did not even wake up to make any effort to get out of bed as he died of massive carbon monoxide inhalation. The purpose of this "forward" is to make aware that most of us use our lap top in bed and often go to sleep with it next to us. Please make it a practice not to do that. The risk is very real. Make it a rule either not to use the lap top in bed.

Please be careful friends.

Know your passport - My Letters - Khaleej Times - Dt. 11.11.2010

My Letters - Khaleej Times - Dt. 11.11.2010 - Know your passport


Know your passport
11 November 2010

This is in reference to a recent letter requesting the travellers to keep the visa page open while they queue in for immigration at the airports.

Travellers should be familiar with their passport entries like any addition of information, special endorsements and of course the page number on which visa is stamped for entry.

Immigration officers have a standard procedure of scanning through all the relevant details starting from the main page and may have queries in case if any additional updates or amendments have been made in the passport. Therefore, one doesn’t have to keep open the visa page before he reaches the officer, but just make sure, he is aware of the pages and entries in his and his families passport. This in turn will help assist the officer as well as the passenger and others for a speedier clearance.
-Ramesh Menon, Abu Dhabi

To read it in original, please visit Khaleej Times online.

My Letters - GULF NEWS Dt. 11.11.2010 - Plan in Advance

My Letters - GULF NEWS Dt. 11.11.2010 - Plan in Advance





Plan in advance


Personally, I have been with several friends in such a situation and know the enormous paper work, money and procedures involved here and in India to repatriate or cremate a deceased. I thank Gulf News for bringing up these points for the benefit of every reader or resident in the UAE. Death cannot be planned, but what the situation may be with regards to the close ones could be planned or detailed in advance with a bit of timely guidance and attention.

From Mr Ramesh Menon
Abu Dhabi

To read it in original, please visit GULF NEWS online.

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Exploring Abu Dhabi through Clicks and Writes - Weather - whether or not to RAIN?

Exploring Abu Dhabi through Clicks and Writes - Weather - whether or not to RAIN?





I wrote here yesterday about the rain coming. In the evening, weather was shy, whether it wanted to rain or not? Finally, a few drops came down, as to make the car more dirty. At night it was breezy and then the lightning started. I thought, wow, an opportunity to capture lightning. I didn't succeed but. Can you predict when the next lightning will strike after the first one? An interesting phenomenon revisited yesterday. If it was in Kerala, at least I could have had frequent opportunity, as the lightning, thunder and rain, all come together heavily and for longer time. Insha allah, it will rain tonight. After all, it rains only for one or two days here, and it should be celebrated. They say it rained heavily in Fujairah last night. May be, we get to repeat the excitement here tonight.

Daily Management Thoughts - 6 ways to generate ideas at work

Daily Management Thoughts - 6 ways to generate ideas at work




Historic US visit can benefit region - My Letters - THE NATIONAL - Dt. 10.11.2010

My Letters - THE NATIONAL - Dt. 10.11.2010 - Historic US visit can benefit region


Historic US visit can benefit region

The visit of the US president Barack Obama to India is of utmost significance to the region (Obama backs a UN seat for India, November 9).

The deals signed for $10 billion in trade with India is expected by some to help to pay for 50,000 US jobs. This will definitely create an interactive flow of personnel and material movements in both countries. The beneficiary of this improved relationship will be the entire region, especially the Middle East. The UAE can gain tremendously in terms of obtaining a larger share of global commerce.

The visit also boosted optimism and hope among the Indian youth and reiterated the need for better education. Mr Obama's call to "keep dreaming big, huge, gigantic dreams" will definitely motivate the youth in the country.

Improved interaction and agreements in advanced technology and sharing, along with Mr Obama's announcement that the US would support India's bid to become a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, calls for applause.

Working together, both countries can create regional peace and prosperity, and work on common goals such as an increasing trade, creating green jobs, procuring affordable energy resources with low-carbon growth, strengthening agriculture and health care, as well as strengthening democratic governance and human rights.

May "together we can" be the renewed mantra of this progressive movement. This truly inspiring visit will definitely be advantageous for the entire region in the years ahead.

Ramesh Menon, Abu Dhabi

To read it in original, please visit THE NATIONAL online.


Ramesh Menon, Abu Dhabi

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Exploring Abu Dhabi - through Clicks and Writes - When it rained

Exploring Abu Dhabi - through Clicks and Writes - When it rained



It just drizzled here in Abu Dhabi yesterday. It brought memories of the rain back home and also a heavy rainy season few years back. Normally, it rains only one or two days. The weatherman predicts light showers in the next few days. Hope, we get to see good rain this time, although, it may spoil some off road plans of many during the holidays.

The pictures are of a rainy season some years ago. It is obvious from the old taxis, which are almost extinct from the city roads these days.

Monday, November 8, 2010

ജിമെയില്‍ നിറയുമ്പോള്‍ സഹായിക്കാന്‍

ജിമെയില്‍ നിറയുമ്പോള്‍ സഹായിക്കാന്‍



ഇമെയില്‍ സേവനരംഗത്ത് വിപ്ലവകരമായ മാറ്റങ്ങളുമായിട്ടാണ് ഗൂഗിളിന്റെ ജിമെയില്‍ രംഗത്തെത്തിയത്. അതുവരെ ഇമെയിലുകള്‍ക്ക് നാല് മുതല്‍ 10 വരെ എം.ബി സ്ഥലമായിരുന്നു ഇമെയില്‍ സേവന ദാതാക്കളായ ഹോട്ട്‌മെയില്‍, യാഹൂ, റീഡിഫ് തുടങ്ങിയവര്‍ സൗജ്യമായി അനുവദിച്ചിരുന്നത്. കൂടുതല്‍ സ്ഥലം ആവശ്യമുള്ളവര്‍ പണം നല്‍കണമായിരുന്നു.

മേല്‍പ്പറഞ്ഞ കമ്പനികളെല്ലാം അധിക സംഭരണശേഷിക്ക് പണം ആവശ്യപ്പെട്ടിരുന്ന സമയത്താണ് ഒരു ജി.ബി. സംഭരണശേഷി സൗജന്യമായി നല്‍കിക്കൊണ്ട് ജിമെയില്‍ എത്തുന്നത്. ഇമെയില്‍ രംഗത്തെ അടിമുടി മാറ്റിമറിച്ച ഒന്നായിരുന്നു ജിമെയിലിന്റെ അവതാരം.

2004 ഏപ്രില്‍ ഒന്നിനാണ് ജിമെയിലിന്റെ ബീറ്റാവകഭേദം പൊതുജനങ്ങള്‍ക്ക് ലഭ്യമായത്. ഉയര്‍ന്ന സംഭരണശേഷിയും, ഉപഭോക്തൃസൗഹൃദ സങ്കേതങ്ങളും ജിമെയിലിനെ വേഗം ജനപ്രിയമാക്കി. ജിമെയിലിനോട് പിടിച്ചു നില്‍ക്കാന്‍ സൗജന്യസ്ഥലം കൂടുതല്‍ അനുവദിച്ചേ തീരൂ എന്ന നിലയ്‌ക്കെത്തി മറ്റ് ഇമെയില്‍ സേവനദാതാക്കള്‍. അങ്ങനെ മറ്റ് ഇമെയില്‍ സര്‍വീസുകളും സ്റ്റോറേജ് പരിധി ഉയര്‍ത്തി.

ജിമെയില്‍ ഇപ്പോള്‍ 7514 എം.ബി (ഏഴ് ജിബിക്കു മുകളില്‍) സംഭരണസ്ഥലം സൗജന്യമായി നല്‍കുന്നു. സാധാരണ ഗതിയില്‍ ഈ സ്ഥലം ധാരാളമാണ്. ഫോട്ടോകളും വീഡിയോ ക്ലിപ്പിങുകളുമടങ്ങിയ മള്‍ട്ടിമീഡിയ സന്ദേശങ്ങള്‍ ഏറിയതോടെ, ജിമെയിലിന്റെ സ്ഥലം പോലും തികയാത്ത അവസ്ഥയിലാണ് ഇപ്പോള്‍ പലരും. ഒരു മെയിലും കളയാതെ അഥവാ ഡിലീറ്റ് ചെയ്യാതെ സൂക്ഷിക്കുന്നവര്‍ പ്രത്യേകിച്ചും.

ജിമെയിലിലെ സ്ഥലം നിറഞ്ഞു കഴിഞ്ഞാല്‍ 'You have run out of space for your Gmail account' എന്നൊരു സന്ദേശം ലഭിക്കും. അതു കഴിഞ്ഞാല്‍ തുടര്‍ന്ന് ആ ജിമെയില്‍ അക്കൗണ്ടില്‍ നിന്ന് മെയിലുകള്‍ അയക്കുകയോ സ്വീകരിക്കുകയോ ചെയ്യുക സാധ്യമാകില്ല. അനാവശ്യമായ മെയിലുകള്‍ കളയുകയുകയാണ് ഇതിനുള്ള പരിഹാരം. അല്ലെങ്കില്‍ കൂടുതല്‍ സ്ഥലം പണം കൊടുത്തുവാങ്ങുക.

ജിമെയില്‍ ഇന്‍ബോക്‌സിലെ വലിയ മെയിലുകള്‍ തിരഞ്ഞുപിടിച്ചു കളയുക എന്നത് ഏറെ സമയം പിടിക്കുന്ന കാര്യമാണ്. findbigmail.com എന്ന വെബ്‌സൈറ്റ് നിങ്ങളുടെ ജിമെയില്‍ ഇന്‍ബോക്‌സില്‍ മുഴുവന്‍ തിരഞ്ഞ് വലിയ മെയിലുകള്‍, കുറച്ചുകൂടി വലിയവ, ഏറ്റവും വലിയവ എന്നിങ്ങനെ മെയിലുകളെ തരംതിരിച്ച് അനാവശ്യമായ ഒഴിവാക്കാന്‍ നിങ്ങളെ സഹായിക്കും. ഇങ്ങനെ മെയിലുകളെ വലിപ്പത്തിനനുസരിച്ച തരംതിരിച്ച ശേഷം വെവ്വേറെ ഫോള്‍ഡറുകളിലാക്കി സൂക്ഷിക്കാം. അതിനാല്‍ വലിപ്പംകൂടിയ മെയിലുകള്‍ പ്രത്യേകം തുറന്നുനോക്കി അനാവശ്യമായവയെ ഒഴിവാക്കാന്‍ എളുപ്പമാണ്.

ഇതിനായി findbigmail.com തുറന്ന ശേഷം നിങ്ങളുടെ ജിമെയില്‍ ഐ.ഡി. നല്‍കണം. തുടര്‍ന്ന് ജിമെയിലില്‍ ലോഗിന്‍ ചെയ്യാനും സേവനം തുടരാനുള്ള അനുവാദവും ചോദിക്കും. അതിന് ശേഷമാണ് തിരച്ചില്‍ തുടങ്ങുക. ഇന്‍ബോക്‌സിലുള്ള മെയിലുകളുടെ വലിപ്പവും എണ്ണത്തിനും അനുസരിച്ച് തിരയലിന്റെ സമയം കൂടും ചെയ്യും. ഇങ്ങനെ സെര്‍ച്ചിങ് കഴിഞ്ഞാല്‍ വലിയ മെയിലുകളുടെ എണ്ണത്തെപ്പറ്റിയുള്ള വിവരം ഉപഭോക്താവിന്റെ അക്കൗണ്ടിലേക്ക് മെയില്‍ അയച്ചതായുള്ള വിവരം നല്‍കും.




കടപ്പാട് : മാതൃഭൂമി

Sunday, November 7, 2010

Exploring Abu Dhabi - through Clicks and Writes - Winners Takes it all

Exploring Abu Dhabi - through Clicks and Writes - Winners Takes it all


Indian Sports and Cultural Centre Abu Dhabi (ISCC) encourage sporting activities amongst its members and public. Here is a display of trophies waiting for winners of an annual event.

CLEAN YOUR KIDNEYS IN LESS THAN Rs 1.00

CLEAN YOUR KIDNEYS IN LESS THAN Rs 1.00


Years pass by and our kidneys are filtering the blood by removing salt, poison and any unwanted food entering our body. With time, the salt accumulates and this needs to undergo cleaning treatments and how are we going to overcome this?


It is very easy, first take a bunch of Cilantro (MALLI Leaves)KOTHIMBIR (DHANIYA)and wash it clean. Then cut it in small pieces and put it in a pot and pour clean water and boil it for ten minutes and let it cool down and then filter it and pour in a clean bottle and keep it inside refrigerator to cool.


Drink one glass daily and all salt and other accumulated poison will come out of your kidney by urination. Also you will be able to notice the difference in your health, which you never felt before.

Parsley is known as a good cleaning treatment for kidneys and it is natural! 

Saturday, November 6, 2010

My Letters - GULF NEWS - The cost of dying: What to expect when it's not expected


The cost of dying: What to expect when it's not expected

Death comes to us all — but careful planning can take the pain out of dying for your family and friends
By Deena Kamel Yousef, Staff Reporter
Published: 00:00 November 6, 2010
Reader comments (2)

Dying in Dubai is expensive: families must start saving money and preparing for the death of a loved one to avoid financial and legal problems after the event.
Image Credit: Supplied

We are confronted with images of death and dying on television everyday, yet it is an uncomfortable topic that many families are unwilling to talk or think about. Often a cultural taboo, discussing the death of a family member and how to deal with the body and the estate is considered offensive to the elders.

PDF: Grave charges

Every day four people die in Dubai and every three out of those four will be expatriates, according to statistics.

It's a sobering fact that does not usually occur to Dubai's young population, here to pursue a better living standard and higher income.

Why open a can of worms, you say?

Consider the facts: The costs that a family must bear if a relative dies on the other side of the world from home can run into thousands of dirhams. Families are usually unprepared for the bureaucracy and red tape of getting the paperwork, organising the embalming, or sending the body home—all in the middle of grieving for a loved one.

The person's accounts are frozen and visa is cancelled—leaving the dependants without enough money for survival and forced to leave the country. Life insurance may not be paid out immediately and the court may take months, if not years, to distribute the person's estate. Those that do not set aside a lump sum of money behind for the family leave behind a knot of financial problems for their family to sort.

Dying in Dubai is expensive: families must start saving money and preparing for the death of a loved one to avoid financial and legal problems after the event.

The Valley of Love, a non-government organization, last year reported 100 cases of families facing financial problems following the death of a relative.

Gulf News takes you through the paper trail and cost of death in Dubai, providing experts' advice on how to prepare for the event.

Additional specifics on Repatriation costs:

- Calculated by kilo of body and coffin weight. Varies by destination, airlines and total weight. Saving tip: repatriate the body in a cheaper and lighter coffin and transfer to a more elaborate one at home.

- Repatriation to India: Air India transports human remains to any Indian city for free. Other airlines will ship to India with a 50 per cent discount on IATA rates. Charge is approximately Dh20 per kilo. Total cargo cost is Dh1,500.

- Repatriation to Pakistan: Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) ships human remains and provides the accompanying person's ticket for free

- Repatriation to the UK, Dh65-Dh70 per kilo.

- Repatriation to Africa, Dh95-Dh100 per kilo. It is the most expensive destination.

- Repatriation to Egypt or Lebanon, Dh20-Dh30 per kilo

- Total cost to Europe, Dh20,000 (includes documentation, fees, repatriation).

- Total cost to the Middle East, Dh10,000

- Total cost to Africa, Dh25,000- Dh30,000

- Shipping surcharges: Security surcharge (Dh0.20 to 0.80 per kilo), Fuel surcharges (Dh1 to Dh3 per kilo, depending on fuel prices), screening charge (Dh0.11 per kilo)

- Help line: Call Emirates Sky Cargo services for further details on 04-2184218

Sources:
Abhay Pathak, Regional Manager, Gulf, Middle East and Africa, Air India
Craig Holding, financial adviser and associate director of Acuma Wealth Management.
Helen Williams, Bereavement counsellor, Keith Nicholl Medical Centre, Dubai
Joseph Bobby, Vice President of the Valley of Love, a non-profit organization
Mohammed Marria, senior estate planner for Just Wills, a firm specializing in succession planning
Roy Gaunt, Chartered insurance broker, Nexus Insurance Brokers
Vivian Albertyn, Managing Partner of Middle East Funeral Services, Dubai
DNATA Cargo


Have you experienced financial trouble after the death of a loved on? Have you taken steps to avoid similar issues in the future?

My Comments:


Two excellent and must read articles for expats in UAE. Could be be termed as "Thoughts before we die" in UAE. Personally, I have been with several friends in such situation and and know the enormous paper work money and procedures involved here and India to repatriate or cremate a deceased. Thanks for bringing up these for the benefit of every reader or resident in UAE. Death cannot be planned, but what the situation may be with regards to the close ones could some what be planned or detailed in advance with a bit of timely guidance and attention by such articles.


Ramesh Menon, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

To read it in original, please visit GULF NEWS Online.

Please also read:

How to save and prepare for death

Financial, legal and psychology experts provide their top tips on how to financially prepare and save money in case of a death in the family.
  • By Deena Kamel Yousef, Staff Reporter
  • Published: 13:25 November 6, 2010
Grave Charges
  • Dying in Dubai is expensive: families must start saving money and preparing for the death of a loved one to avoid financial and legal problems after the event.
  • Image Credit: Supplied
1. Open an offshore account. A person’s single and joint bank accounts will be automatically frozen upon death, leaving the family with no access to money. Having a bank account outside the jurisdiction of the UAE and home country means the family can withdraw money for survival and emergency expenses

2. Put some money in a bank account under a family member or loved one’s name.

3. Set aside emergency funds overseas.

PDF: Grave charges 
4. Have an honest and open discussion with your spouse or family about your finances.

5. Draw up a will detailing how to split your assets among inheritors. Will cost, Dh3,000; legal costs, Dh1,500-Dh2,000; execution of will in court, Dh45,000-Dh50,000.

6. Buy life insurance: Check the benefits, clauses and time period between the death and the payment. Choose between term insurance and whole of life insurance. You can opt for Islamic life insurance (Takaful) or term insurance which does not rely on investments and is Sharia compliant. Men, older people, and those with risky hobbies have higher premiums. Suicide within the first two years of buying a policy is not covered.

7. Get free advice. Some lawyers and funeral service providers give free advice on steps to take after the person’s death.

8. Approach local non-government organizations or your embassy for financial assistance.

9. Death is the ultimate abandonment. Bereavement counselling is available in Dubai for those unable to deal with loss of a loved one. A 90-minute session costs Dh450.

10. Check your work package if you have funeral and repatriation coverage. Check medical insurance for repatriation costs.

11. Save about 25 per cent of your salary, not just for your death but for your family’s life.

12. Before the deceased’s account is unfrozen, debts must be paid out first from those accounts. Pay your debts regularly to avoid from piling up.

13. Make a list of your assets, liabilities, insurance, stock or investments here and abroad, so the will executor knows where to locate the money.

14. Get off your partner’s visa and onto your employer’s sponsorship if you are working. The deceased’s visa gets cancelled and you will have to leave the country.

15. Don’t rely on your company for death and services benefits.

16. Nominate beneficiaries for your life insurance so they can receive the money.

17. Draft a will and email it to your relatives. Keep the original at home or with a lawyer for records.

18. Write how you would like your body dealt with after death.

19. Write a list of emergency contacts.

20. It is cheaper to be cremated in the UAE than repatriated. Budget airlines do not provide a repatriation service.

http://gulfnews.com/business/your-money/how-to-save-and-prepare-for-death-1.707169

Short Take - Gulf Today - Dt. 06.11.2010 - Changed Attitude


Short Take - Gulf Today - Dt. 06.11.2010 - Changed Attitude



Changed attitudes

Every morning when I walk to my car, I get to see a school bus coming to pick up a group of students to an Arabic school. A teacher is also among them to get in from this stop. As I observe each of them inside and outside the bus, there is little interaction. The bus arrives, the children gets in followed by the master. Absolutely no reaction from them and from him, no greetings or whatsoever to each other. They all fully engrossed in listening to their ipods to some music or playing on their mobiles.

The scene revives memories of my own school days and relationship and respect existed those days between students and teachers. Has it withered away as the time passed? May be it is a one-off case, and let me console thinking that way.

Ramesh Menon

To read it in original, please visit GULF TODAY online.

Thursday, November 4, 2010